In this parable the giving of a pound each is slightly different than in the Matthew 25:15 passage which was refers to the talents given according to the ability of the receiver.  In this passage everyone receives the same amount.  There is a key phrase used, "occupy til I come" which one might conclude means some kind of work movement.  No two believers are given the same degree of talent, but that is no excuse for doing nothing at all.  In reality is just means to stay busy using your talents and getting the gospel message out to a lost world until Christ returns. 

The third man in the story represents the person (either male or female) who just thinks because of being saved by grace plus nothing, is all that is needed.  I coined a phrase that fellow believers sometimes don't like:  "Saved plus nothing equals nothing."  By this I mean that when you are saved, you don't sit around and do nothing and expect everything good to happen to you.  You've been transformed from the inside out and are willing to work in God's vineyard to help others come to know Christ as their savior.  The third man made the excuse that he knew what the master was like but he really didn't know him at all.  The word 'napkin' used in the KJV Bible is just a sweat cloth.  You don't lay up the money in a sweat cloth, but instead you put it on your head and get to work.    Lastly there are the thoughts of the people who hated this man.  This is a true picture of the Jews in Jesus' day.  It is still true even today among most Jewish people.  Zechariah 12:10 tells us there is a day coming when they will recognize Jesus for who he really is as a nation and mourn. It says this:  'They shall look upon Me whom they have pierced and all of the Israel nation will mourn.'  This coincides with John 19:37 and will be totally fulfilled when Jesus comes back in Revelation 19:11-17.  However, this will also be true of Gentile nations as well.  Today truly is the day to accept Christ because none of us are promised another day on this earth. 



Leave a Reply.